FLORAL EVOLUTION

My evolution/progression of trying to bring all my ideas together into one cohesive design collection has been both exciting and extremely stressful. I have had little resistance to constructing new and exciting visuals for my floral designs, but have absolutely hated the digital side…..I still am unable to proficiently translate my ideas into the fantastic world of Photoshop and Illustrator.

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This was done by hand…..and with a lot of patience too!!!!! Lots of printing out an image and manipulating it vertically and horizontally to create a mirror effect. I love the interplay between colour and monotone, but feel the design is a little to graphic. Helen and Sian raised the fact that the floral motifs didn’t sit quite correctly with the stylised rose motifs; floating heads I believe they called it. What could I do to remedy this? Could I permeate the colour outwards into the monotone floral motifs? Would this create a softer and less graphic aesthetic? This is something I will definitely explore.

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Continuing on from my previous design I wanted to create a softer and more fluid description of the greenery of flowers and plants. Believe it or not this design was a mistake!! I was trying to use Brusho to create a pattern from a Vellum Tracing Paper Stencil, which didn’t turn out as successfully as I had hoped. However,  every cloud has a silver lining; a direct transfer of the excess crystal pigment and water from the Vellum Stencil onto paper created the most beautiful pattern, which instantly reminded me of the leaves/greenery of my chosen flowers. Again, I manipulated the design and printed it out flipped horizontally and vertically to create a mirror repeat. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!! I could imagine seeing this printed on fabric and embellished with a digital stitch replica of my linear observational drawing of a Rose.

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Seeing my Rose drawing made me remember something that Helen had said in one of my PT’s; looking at the linear qualities within my work to see how I could manipulate them to create a range of new surface pattern designs. I thought I could fuse one of my favourite techniques…….COLLAGE…..to create something textural and visually exciting.

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Printed out numerous copies of my Rose drawing, ripping into varying different sizes and adhering to paper with Pritt-Stick. I am so happy with the resulting design idea and think it would look fantastic as a BLENDER design within my collection. Could I manipulate it in photoshop to create it as a new colour? This is another avenue to explore when I finalise my colour palette.

As Paul Klee once said ‘DRAWING IS TAKING A LINE FOR A WALK’. The linear kineticism of this design is intense…..I LOVE IT.

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I wanted to progress my initial design into something more descriptive of a Secondary pattern, so decided to utilise some of my chosen colours within an existing monotone design. Taking inspiration from KAROLINA YORK PRINT STUDIOS I wanted to fuse the hand-drawn element with bold and on trend colour, specifically only choosing to colour the alternate diagonals. Where could i take this further? I would like to see what colour background would work with the chosen colours and monotone hand-drawn element. Watch this space.

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This design was created with the remnants of a previous design idea, but me being me decided to incorporate the knowledge gained from researching COLOUR THEORY @ THE BAUHAUS, specifically looking at Johannes Itten, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and Josef Albers. Could an element of my design be utilised in both geometric and organic way? It is reminiscent of a design by GP & J BAKER…..’BARCELONA’ in Indigo.

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I adore how each floral interpretation has been framed to create an almost gallery like quality of fabric. Motifs both separate and fuse together all the design ideas.

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Arranging my Daffodil observational drawing into a mirror repeat. Yes I know that there is no colour in the flower, but I was actually toying with the idea to utilise the colour as a background. Could I toy around with mixing a range of yellows to create depth? Could I utilise coloured green stencil cutouts to create a motif around the daffodils too?

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I chose to create this leaf motif on a separate page to see if I actually liked the design, but as it turns out I do!!!! I need to cut out more of this colour/pattern/design, but am looking forward to exploring how to create a repeat in Photoshop too. I have thoroughly enjoyed this avenue of exploration and now feel far more confident of what to include within my final collection.

THE POWER OF FLOWERS

Having always had an affinity with Nature, I didn’t quite realise how therapeutic drawing flowers is; a continuous line to create shape, pattern, form and texture soothe my soul. My Dad always has instilled within me the mantra that ‘there is no right or wrong way to draw, but rather an expression of your own self and individuality’.

The last few days have seen me at my most creative and I am struggling to reign in all my ideas, but one of the core ingredients of my success would have to be the ability to deconstruct an idea then reconstruct it in a number of different ways, which is what I have done.

I am not proficient on Photoshop or Illustrator, but have the technical know-how to create repeat patterns and juxtaposition by the good old fashioned way….BY HAND!!!

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This exercise was extremely labour intensive; photocopy each image numerous times, ‘cut out’ with my fingers, arrange by eye, and then spray mount and adhere to the sketchbook page. However, I am really proud of my effort. The flowers I I have drawn are: ROSE, IRIS, & HYDRANGEA.

The process of Repeat Patterns is extremely cathartic for me, it feeds my OCD rather nicely, plus it looks great!!

I concentrated deliberately on form, line and shape first and made the conscious decision not to overburden studies with colour until I knew that the design was strong enough to take forward.

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Again, playing around with the size of the image can create a wonderfully cohesive and fluid pattern, not to mention its a wonderful way to make sure that the image works well within the overall space.

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Experimenting with the stylisation of Roses within a surface pattern context, adding BRUSHO and water, and then strategically placing an acetate replica of the same image over the top, but making sure that the image is slightly off kilter to allow for a 3-D effect. Colours specifically chosen as a nod to WGSN.

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I photocopied (A3) my Felt samples (from my Felt workshop @ Art Van Go) and began by creating a ‘busy, colourful and textural collage background. I didn’t want to use colour within my observational Iris drawing, so photocopied it numerous times and cut out each image (time consuming!!!! 2hours!!!), juxtaposing them to create a repeat pattern. I am incredibly pleased with this design and would love to incorporate this somehow into my final coordinating designs.

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Now, this was a labour of love!! It involved experimenting with BRUSHO and water in an atomiser. The idea was to create a range (around 4 A4 pieces of paper incorporating the mixing of BRUSHO colours) colour palettes, which when dry could be ripped up and torn to create a highly textures and fluid (Busy) background. Some of my quick Rose & Hydrangea sketches were juxtaposed as a repeat pattern, eventually being embellished with Gold (Pilot Fine-liner). The result is fantastic, and I am really honing my own individual visual handwriting.

WATCH THIS SPACE.

 

 

FLORAL RESEARCH

I thought it prudent of me to research some of my personal favourite artworks incorporating Flowers. I have always found it important to immerse myself in the design of the past to be able to create designs for the future. How can I go about my visual and handwritten research? My chosen images will all have specific aspects/facets of interest that I wish to explore; mark-making, observational drawing, painting, stitch, print, continuous line drawing and collage will allow me to create a visually rich and creative body of research, enabling me to hone my final designs.

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HENRI MATISSE, SAFRANO ROSES AT THE WINDOW, 1925, OIL ON CANVAS

FAUVISM, POST-IMPRESSIONISM

Why have I chosen this? Only recently have I come to appreciate Matisse, previously thinking his work was amateur at best. Today, I master at his beautiful and diverse range of mark-making qualities found with his colourful and expressive opus. I will endeavour to create my own range of floral/bloom studies inspired by Matisse.

Aspects to explore: Line and Colour

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EDOUARD MANET, FLOWERS IN A CRYSTAL VASE, 1882, OIL ON CANVAS

IMPRESSIONISM, REALISM

Why have I chosen this? Manet is one of my all time favourite artists, and is considered one of the fathers of Modert Art. His natural progression from Realism into Impressionism lifted his work to another level. When looking at his work you are transported to a time and place in which you can smell, see, touch and taste we he did at the time. Time to sketch in the style of Manet.

Aspects to explore: Brushstrokes and realism.

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VINCENT VAN GOGH, IRISES, 1889, OIL ON CANVAS

REALISM, POST-IMPRESSIONISM, EXPRESSIONISM

Why have I chosen this? Van Gogh, although now extremely commercial and well known, has always been a favourite of mine. I tend to prefer his lesser known work, it exudes a more intimate and personal documentation between the thin line of madness and genius. His expressive fluid lines have always tantalised me to take a journey through every square inch of his work.

Aspects to explore: Texture, line and pattern

KEEFE

 

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, RED CANNA, 1924, OIL ON CANVAS

AMERICAN MODERNISM, ABSTRACT ART, MODERNISM

Why have I chosen this? Although not the biggest fan of O’Keeffe’s work, I admire the beautiful etherial qualities of her more abstract work. A lot of people have speculated  her abstract floral designs have a deeper meaning; flowers being a metaphor for the female reproductive organs, specifically the vulva. Her use of colour is incredible.

Aspects to explore: Colour co-ordination, layering, abstraction

HANS

HANS BOLLONGIER, STILL LIFE WITH FLOWERS, 1639, OIL ON CANVAS

Why have I chosen this? I had not previously heard of this artist, but knew about the Dutch Golden Age, especially the work of The Dutch Masters such as BOSCH, VERMEER, HALS & RIJN. The mastery of observational skills found within this time period is infectious to me; imagine what I could complete with skills such as this!! A BUSY BLOOM, if ever I saw one, and absolutely perfect to explore for this project. Rich, earthy, yet subdued colours draw the views in…touch me, feel me and desire me.

Aspects to explore:  Observational drawing, colour theory

MORRIS

WILLIAM MORRIS, IRISES, YELLOW AND COBALT BLUE, CIRCA 1890, PRINT

Why have I chosen this? Morris is a master of pattern and colour, and my chosen design incorporates some of my favourite subject matter found within artwork…IRISES & BIRDS. I wonder if I can research books/workshops allowing me to learn and study how to master observing these subject areas.

Aspects to explore: Photoshop, Illustrator, workshops

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OLILON REDON, BOUQUET OF FLOWERS, 1900-05, PASTEL ON PAPER

Why have I chosen this?  I adore the subtleties within the floral works of Redon; pastel on paper allows a rich and subdued quality to live in symbiosis It’s as if individual aspects of the painting are allowed to live as one, but ultimately marry together to create a vision of beauty and simplicity.

Aspects to explore: Oil/pastel, observational study, colour co-ordination

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CLAUDE MONET, WATERLILLIES, 1916, OIL ON CANVAS

Why have I chosen this? Possibly one of the most famous paintings studying a floral motif. I specifically chose one of the slightly less known of the series, primarily for it’s juxtaposition and vibrant use of colour. The floral aspect is both highly observational and stylised.

Aspects to explore: Stylisation, observational studies, colour theory

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JAN DAVIDSZ DE HEEM, FESTOON WITH FLOWERS, 1660-70, OIL ON CANVAS

Why have I chosen this? Possibly one of the most magnificent floral studies I have ever seen. The marriage between the intense colour and monotone nature of the black only adds to the vibrancy and life-force of the painting.

Aspects to explore: Juxtaposition of individual studies, contrast exploration

Having discussed the brief in detail, I now find myself wanting to find out more about the Symbolism, History and multi-dimensionality of the flower through the subject of Art & Design. The next stop is to find out more about my chosen Trend…BUSY BLOOMS.