JOURNAL RESEARCH: SELVEDGE – ISSUE 80

Seeing as I have been subscribing to this magazine for a while now, I decided to begin selecting articles/designers/companies/workshops that may be of interest currently or in the future.

An advert on Page 6 piqued my interest; Chateau Dumas in France offers week long residential courses, and the Floral Embroidery course ran by Karen Nichol, running from 4-11th August , would be an opportunity I would endeavour to grasp with both hands. Unfortunately, when looking at the website I found that this workshop had already sold out…DRAT!! However, I have now subscribed to receive e-mails of all the upcoming and future workshops.

http://www.chateaudumas.net/workshops

I found an article about her on the Internet via a Blog website Flowerina (Founded and Photographed by Rona)

Nichol, K. (Associated with Flowerina) (2012) Available at: https://flowerona.com/2012/11/introducing-textile-artist-karen-nicol/. Accessed: 2 March 2018.

Her work is superb and has a wonderful collage feel to it, which got me thinking about how I could incorporate that technique within my current DIGITAL MATTERS Project: Busy Blooms.

I was also excited to find that May Morris, the youngest daughter of Arts & Crafts pioneer William Morris, had a collective exhibition @ The William Morris Gallery, but then found out I had missed it!!!!! The subsequent positive aspect of this article allowed me to find out about May Morris, considering I had never heard of her before. Her embroideries are incredible, which in turn re-established the craft as a serious art form. I will keep an eye out for her future exhibitions. Time to research her via the Cardiff met library.

http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions-43/may-morris

William Morris Society, May Morris

Morris, M. Apples, Embroidery, William Morris Gallery, London. Available at: http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions-43/may-morris. Accessed: 2 March 2018.

Page 57!! Finally, but by no means last, was a delightful article on the benefits of using Knit and Stitch to improve health. This is something that really resonated with me; living with a long-tern health condition means that I am often unable to undertake activities which would allow me to travel or work in a busy environment. This article documents the health benefits gained from the processes of knit and stitch, but more than that it details how it can alter our brainwaves to create new brain cells and pathways. Hand function is key when looking at the development of our brains through evolution, and the complex rhythmic patterns and repetitions utilise a lot portion of the brain. Serotonin is is released, which in turn raises the mood and eventually make a more active and happy individual. Art has been incredibly healing to me, I think without it Life would not mean much to me.