SECONDARY SITUATIONS

Now that I had completed my HERO design the progression of my SECONDARY designs sped up exponentially. Sian (my Tutor) was right, you cannot expect to create a cohesive collection of designs without first pinning down the HERO.

Strangely enough, I actually thought these designs would take as long, if not more as the HERO. The workshops with Matt now allowed me to create the designs in the manner I wanted without any technical hindrance.

SECONDARY 1

For my first SECONDARY design, I utilised these 2 elements:

To remove the background on the coloured Rosebud I chose to use the MAGIC WAND and increased the tolerance to 55, making sure I clicked as close to the outline of the rose as humanly possible. When the marching ants appeared I hit the backspace to remove the background. I then selected the LAYER Tab > New Fill Layer > Solid Colour, and chose black as the solid colour. I dragged the rose layer beneath the solid fill colour and used the ERASER TOOL, in varying sizes, and ZOOM TOOL to remove any ‘static’ that would cause problems at a later stage. Once all the ‘static’ had been removed I then deleted the solid colour fill layer to showcase the rosebud on a ‘zero’ background.

The B&W Rose was really easy to clean:

Image > Adjustments > Gradient Map > Making sure that the white is white and the black is black (only these 2 contrasts should be visible) > Magic Wand (Tolerance 30-40) > Making sure the Contiguous is unticked

I created 3-4 New Duplicate Layers to bulk out the line and create a far more poignant black line and merged the layers together. I then used the ERASER TOOL to remove any ‘static’ and messy lines. I then created a new canvas and dragged the linear layer into/onto the canvas. Again, I used the ERASER TOOL to remove the surrounding background and merged the remaining white background contained within the rose and linear layer together.

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I specifically have chosen not to colour the larger rose motif as it acknowledges the trend to juxtapose coloured and B&W images together, especially influenced by the French design house THEVENON. The background colour was chosen as #c5e6e1 but may change when the whole collection is finished. Again, I absolutely love the design and colour combo.

SECONDARY 2

For my next SECONDARY design I used these elements:

I created a Print quality A3 Canvas in Photoshop and opened up my file library, choosing the abstract foliage print I had previously manipulated in Photoshop (colour). I used the FREE TRANSFORM TOOL (CMD+T) to shrink the image down (holding SHIFT all the while), and when the image was sat perfectly @ 25% of the A3 canvas (pink lines should inform of the correct proportions) I selected the LAYER Tab, scrolling to DUPLICATE LAYER. Using the MOVE TOOL I carefully dragged this new layer over to sit perfectly beside its neighbour. To create the reflection of the image I selected the EDIT Tab, scrolling down to TRANSFORM and then down to FLIP HORIZONTAL. I then selected both images and chose to DUPLICATE LAYERS, pulling the new layer down and repeating the TRANSFORM step, only this time choosing the FLIP HORIZONTAL. If any blemishes or lines are visible I would choose to use the SPOT HEALING BRUSH TOOL, which remedies any problems arisen from the duplication.

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The linear studies of Buddleia and Cotoneaster were manipulated in exactly the same process as the B&W Rose in my first SECONDARY. I placed each motif strategically to create the most aesthetic and visual impact. I love it!!!!!!!! I made sure, by way of adhering the pink lines, to keep all the motifs as symmetrical as the background.

Next step? Finishing the BLENDERS………..

THE POWER OF FLOWERS

Having always had an affinity with Nature, I didn’t quite realise how therapeutic drawing flowers is; a continuous line to create shape, pattern, form and texture soothe my soul. My Dad always has instilled within me the mantra that ‘there is no right or wrong way to draw, but rather an expression of your own self and individuality’.

The last few days have seen me at my most creative and I am struggling to reign in all my ideas, but one of the core ingredients of my success would have to be the ability to deconstruct an idea then reconstruct it in a number of different ways, which is what I have done.

I am not proficient on Photoshop or Illustrator, but have the technical know-how to create repeat patterns and juxtaposition by the good old fashioned way….BY HAND!!!

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This exercise was extremely labour intensive; photocopy each image numerous times, ‘cut out’ with my fingers, arrange by eye, and then spray mount and adhere to the sketchbook page. However, I am really proud of my effort. The flowers I I have drawn are: ROSE, IRIS, & HYDRANGEA.

The process of Repeat Patterns is extremely cathartic for me, it feeds my OCD rather nicely, plus it looks great!!

I concentrated deliberately on form, line and shape first and made the conscious decision not to overburden studies with colour until I knew that the design was strong enough to take forward.

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Again, playing around with the size of the image can create a wonderfully cohesive and fluid pattern, not to mention its a wonderful way to make sure that the image works well within the overall space.

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Experimenting with the stylisation of Roses within a surface pattern context, adding BRUSHO and water, and then strategically placing an acetate replica of the same image over the top, but making sure that the image is slightly off kilter to allow for a 3-D effect. Colours specifically chosen as a nod to WGSN.

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I photocopied (A3) my Felt samples (from my Felt workshop @ Art Van Go) and began by creating a ‘busy, colourful and textural collage background. I didn’t want to use colour within my observational Iris drawing, so photocopied it numerous times and cut out each image (time consuming!!!! 2hours!!!), juxtaposing them to create a repeat pattern. I am incredibly pleased with this design and would love to incorporate this somehow into my final coordinating designs.

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Now, this was a labour of love!! It involved experimenting with BRUSHO and water in an atomiser. The idea was to create a range (around 4 A4 pieces of paper incorporating the mixing of BRUSHO colours) colour palettes, which when dry could be ripped up and torn to create a highly textures and fluid (Busy) background. Some of my quick Rose & Hydrangea sketches were juxtaposed as a repeat pattern, eventually being embellished with Gold (Pilot Fine-liner). The result is fantastic, and I am really honing my own individual visual handwriting.

WATCH THIS SPACE.

 

 

WHAT IS VISUAL HANDWRITING?

Hand-writing is your own personal style. It’s the bit that sets you are apart. That’s the mark-making you employ, or the medium you use. It can also be affected by the style/ genre you are working within.

It is vitally important to have your own Visual Handwriting, what are you without it?

What is Identity? The characteristics determining who or what a person or thing is.

Synonyms of Identity: INDIVIDUALITY, SELFHOOD, EGO, PERSONALITY, CHARACTER, ORIGINALITY, DISTINCTIVENESS,  DISTINCTION, SINGULARITY, UNIQUENESS

What is Identity important? Well, it differentiates between me and the next person. Imagine a world in which we all dress the same, look the same, come up the same ideas and create the same designs; not a world in which I want to belong in. But why is it so important to have my own unique visual handwriting? It defines who I am as an artist and is a direct result of how I interpret the world around me.

I decided to conduct a little experiment of my own today. If I copied the work, specifically floral designs of other artists, would the work look identical or would my visual handwriting create a new story?

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Is my identity the marks I make in my art? Is it how I interpret the subject matter through my own two eyes? I thoroughly enjoyed drawing this Tulip/Floral arrangement; it allowed me to expand my mark-making repertoire, which in turn will allow me to become a more experienced and creative artist.  Cabinet (Oak, veneered with marquetry of various woods, copper, pewter, tortoiseshell, horn and lapis lazuli), 1680 – Andre-Charles Boulle. 

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I was instantly drawn to this design; having spent nearly all of my childhood spring/summer in my garden,orchards or woodlands abroad, the imagery of apple blossom is synonymous with warmth and magical nature adventures with my Dad. Drawing this allowed me to pour some of my happiness into the drawing in the form of adding a little pink and purple, which strangely in the past I would not consider. Apple/Pirus malus en Peer/Pirus communist, 1905, Lithograph – Theo Nieuwenhuis

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I did not want to incorporate the colour from this design, but rather tried to encapsulate the essence of the corolla and large petal size (looking at the WGSN Trend forecast from BUSY BLOOMS). For me, the most important aspect of this exercise was learning which of my own preferred techniques could offer the most dress, unique and new take on a traditional process. For example, I would love to see how COLLAGE could transform this linear drawing into a fully rounded and highly textural design.

What medium would I use for the collage? Could I spend a day creating a varied amount of different exploratory mark-making studies? Could these studies serve as the medium I use to deconstruct and then reconstruct this design?

Spending time utilising the visual handwriting of others has been invaluable; not only have I a new found respect for the creative processes of others, but I have also improved upon my own way of working.