Continuing on, I decided to utilise some of the skills I had acquired during my previous floral explorative studies; now was the time to incorporate colour, line and pattern.


This study used a stylised approach to flowers you would see in a garden, specifically within my Mum and Dad’s garden. Poppies have been stylised, and the Forget-Me-Not’s and Viola within the rockery section of the garden have been described with Derwent INKENSE pencils and a Derwent Water Brush, with a particular use of the pencil and brush to create texture. Faber Castel PITT Artist Pens were also used to suggest the quality of grass/fronds/leaves. This was an enjoyable experience in mark-making, but more than that it gave me the confidence to use these new instruments, having never used them before.


Having applied the principle of vibrant and exploratory mark-making with the INKTENSE pencils and FABER CASTELL pens, I decided to draw directly from life. I ┬ápicked up a reduced bunch of flowers from Aldi (only a few were still in the land of living, but considering I only paid 5p for them I couldn’t complain) and spent no more than 10minutes on this ‘sketch’. I was really bowled over by how fantastic and descriptive these instruments could be when used in conjunction with each other; a dynamic texture, colour and pattern has been created. A cohesive, fluid mark-making exercise turned out to be really successful.

Creating surface pattern/background with simple INKTENSE pencil shading and Derwent Water Brush. The image on the left is the original design, whilst the image on the right has been enhanced in my Mac ‘Photoshop’ via the Enhance tool. I absolutely love the colour and texture of the design and will experiment with applying some of my designs over the top of it; printing directly onto the surface and cutting out shapes and adhering them to the surface will allow me to explore the possibilities of the proposed final digital design.



Playing around with stylisation and motifs; layering and mark-making. Additionally, I have incorporated a kineticism within these designs which draws the eye all over the page…allowing the viewer to choose favourite elements and interpret patterns, which would be incredibly useful when researching for a future client/s.


Observational studies of one leaf at various different angles. The skill of observational drawing will be essential to me as a practitioner as it will differentiate me between the designers who cannot draw. Drawing is paramount to an artist!! It allows ideas to be conceptualised and carried through to a full and thought out design.


The Muslin was cut to length and width, 750mm x 290mm, and I began by printing the individual elements (Mine and Saima’s) out via my EPSON PHOTO STYLUS XP-620, making sure that I followed the specific printer guidelines set by EPSON. The next step involved the meticulous cropping and guillotine the strips and blocks; steps were cut into 2 widths….1.5CM & 0.75CM. The two sizes were able to compliment the blocks and frame the purposeful discrepancies of the design as a whole.


It was extremely important to create a basic structure of pattern, otherwise the overall effect would look odd; each strip and block were juxtaposed to a specific brief.

Once placed in the specific order the strips and blocks were each, one by one, fixed and iron on individually; the three banners taking 8 hours to finish!!! The iron had to be on it’s hottest setting to allow the image transfer to complete successfully.

It was worth it in the end though. You get out what you put in!!

I just needed to wait an hour or so, then I could iron the banners flat before including in the final design.

I was going to embellish the geometric blocks with a satin stitch border, but I just ran out of time. The idea was to create a ‘ladder’ between the black blocks of the base and top; a metaphor for the journey of Hockney between his home and studio in L.A. I had even toyed with the idea of using a black marker to finish this idea, but thought that I would not be happy with the final solution. On this occasion it would be something I would incorporate next time.